The Awatere Valley stretches from Weld Pass, about 10km south of Blenheim, southwards to Kekerengu on the coast. To the east is a strikingly beautiful coastline where Pacific rollers crash hissing and foaming on steep, sandy beaches or jagged rocks. To the west is a rugged hinterland rising to majestic Mount Tapuae-o-Uenuku, the highest peak along the Kaikoura Ranges.

The Awatere Valley contributes a significant share of Marlborough's rural wealth. Its low rainfall is well suited to grazing sheep and cattle, and growing grain crops, peas, garlic, olives and walnuts. Several vineyards have been established in the area, taking advantage of the area's sweeter soils.

For visitors to the valley, there are a number of accommodation options available: bed and breakfast accommodation, farmstays, motels and backpackers all offer excellent places for visitors to stay.
Seddon, Awatere Valley
The Awatere Valley is a unique and captivating region with a wealth of a wide range of activities and attractions for its visitors, including several outstanding gardens in the picturesque townships of Ward and Seddon where craft and gift shops are well worth a look.

The Awatere Valley is also the gateway to the vast historic Molesworth sheep station. The road through the station is open between January and February each year.
It's a Fact...
FRENCH PASS
D'Urville Island is separated from the mainland by the perilous French Pass, known to Maori as Te Aumiti, through which water passes at up to a fierce eight knots at each tide. Several treacherous whirlpools and surging eddies occur near this passage. French explorer Dumont d'Urville investigated the passage for several days in 1827, and subsequently damaged his ship, Astrolabe, passing through it.
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