At the head of Pelorus Sound, the picturesque fishing port township of Havelock is the principal base for marine farming in the province. Once a thriving gold-mining town, Havelock's main sources of wealth now derive from Greenshell Mussel farming, fishing and tourism. The main street still retains remnants of its colonial past, with many of the original buildings now housing boutique art and craft galleries, cafés and restaurants.

Queen Charlotte Drive, the scenic road that ends at Picton, starts at Havelock. This has to be one of New Zealand's most delightful drives, winding around bush-fringed coastline, past sheltered inlets and bays, alongside flat farmland and through the fertile valleys that once formed the upper reaches of the Sounds.
The Marlborough Sounds
The Marlborough Sounds is a vast maze of deep channels, sheltered waterways and secluded bays, embraced by verdant bush-clad hills. The Sounds encompass Port Underwood to the east; Queen Charlotte Sound, Pelorus and Kenepuru Sounds, forming the central heart of the Sounds; and north to D'Urville Island.

The very isolation of the Marlborough Sounds is its main attraction. Baches, holiday houses and even permanent homes are dotted throughout the hidden bays and coves, as well as a number of luxury resorts and lodges that are only accessible by sea.
It's a Fact...
HAVELOCK
The hamlet at the head of Pelorus Sound acquired its name in 1859. Havelock is named after Major-General Sir Henry Havelock, a British general who was noted for his recapture of Kanpur from rebels during the Indian rebellion of 1857. During Marlborough's gold rush of 1864, Havelock boasted 23 hotels catering to the thirsty miners working the goldfields of the Wakamarina and Cullen Creek. The village is now one of Marlborough's most popular tourist destinations.
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